A call for contributors to a chapter: Early English language learning in Africa

The Routledge Handbook of Teaching English to Young Learners

Editors: Sue Garton and Fiona Copland

A call for contributors to a chapter: Early English language learning in Africa (also attached)

Responses to anne.goodithwhite@ucd.ie AND annetteislei@gmail.com, with Call for TEYL in Africa in subject line. Abstract to be formed for 10th February.

The Handbook Editors are looking for co-authors of a chapter within the Handbook titled:

‘Early English language learning in Africa’. Companion chapters are on Latin America, Asia, Europe and the Middle East. BUT these are only 5 of about 35 chapters in total.

The Editors have approached the LiASIG to assist in organising the Africa chapter.

We currently envisage forming a small team of authors / editors. Any one of them may be writing a section of the chapter (e.g. the historical context), or editing the contributions that can form a section from across the continent (e.g. critical issues and topics).

Please send us your indication of interest and proposals. This could be

  • as brief as a research reference that you think should be included, or
  • a summary of content for a section, or
  • as extensive as a proposal for the structure and content of the whole chapter.

If you would like to play a larger part in authorship, please supply ONE A4 page of CV with significant posts, including current one, and references / soft copy of your dissertation and significant publications. This is in addition to your ideas.

The part being played by the LiASIG Committee is to try and form the team, and help produce an ABSTRACT for the Editors. They have asked for the 10th February 2017.

Audience: the book is for upper-undergraduate / P-G students to support them in their studies (clear style please), and also to be of interest to academics. Will this book ever reach Africa? Will African students be reading it? Such books tend to be very expensive. So this raises an interesting question of ‘who is this chapter for’ – Africa or the rest of the world? This may make it even more important to show that common pedagogic issues do have a particular contextual ‘bent’, and solutions need to come from within.

 Why might you be interested?

  1. The chapter highlights critical issues and current research – yours and your colleagues
  2. There are many false assumptions in the UK that I’ve heard, e.g. that ‘anglophone’ and ‘official language’ means that the population are proficient in these languages – so this chapter is a means of creating awareness. No problems in TEYL are unique, nor strengths, but some tend to stand out in a particular context. We might highlight the continuing strength of oracy; societal multilingualism; individual plurilingualism. How might this be made more use of in the classroom – especially where a ‘large class’ begins at 80, not 30 students?
  3. What does “young learners” mean in the context of Africa? Nursery; Lower Primary; Upper Primary classes?

Looking forward to hearing from you. Please send responses to anne.goodithwhite@ucd.ie AND annetteislei@gmail.com, with Call for TEYL in Africa in subject line.

Advertisements